FMX » Topics » Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

This excerpt taken from the FMX 20-F filed Jun 30, 2009.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

A depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar increases the cost to us of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars and thereby negatively affects our financial position and results of operations. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso may result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S. dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. Although the value of the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar had been fairly stable since 2004, in the fourth quarter of 2008 and continuing into 2009, the Mexican peso depreciated approximately 25% compared to 2007 as a result of uncertainty in the international markets and the downturn in the U.S. economy.

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While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could institute restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.

When the financial markets are volatile, as they have been in recent periods, our results of operations may be substantially affected by variations in exchange rates and commodity prices, and to a lesser degree, interest rates. These effects include foreign exchange gain and loss on assets and liabilities denominated in U.S. dollars, fair value gain and loss on derivative financial instruments, commodities prices and changes in interest income and interest expense. These effects can be much more volatile than our operating performance and our operating cash flows.

This excerpt taken from the FMX 20-F filed Jun 30, 2008.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

A depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar would increase the cost to us of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars and thereby may negatively affect our financial position and results of operations. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso may also result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S. dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could institute restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.

This excerpt taken from the FMX 20-F filed Jun 28, 2007.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

A depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar would increase the cost to us of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars and thereby may negatively affect our financial position and results of operations. We generally do not hedge our exposure to the U.S. dollar with respect to the Mexican peso and other currencies. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso may also result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S.

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dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could institute restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.

This excerpt taken from the FMX 20-F filed Jun 29, 2006.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

A depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar would increase the cost to us of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars and thereby may negatively affect our financial position and results of operations. We generally do not hedge our exposure to the U.S. dollar with respect to the Mexican peso and other currencies. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso may also result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S. dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could institute restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.

This excerpt taken from the FMX 20-F filed Apr 8, 2005.

Depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

A depreciation of the Mexican peso relative to the U.S. dollar would increase the cost to us of a portion of the raw materials we acquire, the price of which is paid in or determined with reference to U.S. dollars, and of

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our debt obligations denominated in U.S. dollars and thereby may negatively affect our financial position and results of operations. We generally do not hedge our exposure to the U.S. dollar with respect to the Mexican peso and other currencies. A severe devaluation or depreciation of the Mexican peso may also result in disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit our ability to transfer or to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies for the purpose of making timely payments of interest and principal on our U.S. dollar-denominated debt or obligations in other currencies. While the Mexican government does not currently restrict, and since 1982 has not restricted, the right or ability of Mexican or foreign persons or entities to convert Mexican pesos into U.S. dollars or to transfer other currencies out of Mexico, the Mexican government could institute restrictive exchange rate policies in the future, as it has done in the past. Currency fluctuations may have an adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.

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